How to write an editorial article for kids

To get a feel for how it's done, read the editorial pages of established newspapers. You'll find a common structure: Editorials start with a description of an issue or problem, lay out a view they disagree with about it, strive to demolish that view with evidence and argument, and propose what the writer believes to be a better solution or a better way of looking at the situation.

How to write an editorial article for kids

Supporting details facts, professional opinions, examples, statistics, etc. In your opinion, do you think this editorial was persuasive? Why or why not? What suggestions do you have for the author of this editorial? Brainstorm a list of editorial topics.

How to Write Newspaper Articles for Kids | Synonym Supporting details facts, professional opinions, examples, statistics, etc. In your opinion, do you think this editorial was persuasive?
Want to Learn How to Write an Editorial? Simply Read This! Most newspaper articles break down into two categories: News articles Feature articles You will also find opinion pieces, like editorials and book and movie reviews.
Why Are Students Not Competent in Writing a Critique Essay? It reflects the majority vote of the editorial board, the governing body of the newspaper made up of editors and business managers.

Have each student select a topic, and then research and write a rough draft of an editorial. Remind your class to include each part of an editorial.

Exchange drafts with partners for feedback on whether the editorial displayed successful persuasive writing. Revise and strengthen the writing as necessary. How to Write an Editorial: Facts and Opinions Step 1: With your students, review the differences between facts and opinions.

Remind them that an opinion is a belief held by a person, whereas a fact is a specific statement which can be proven true. Distribute blank slips of paper to your students, instructing them to write a fact on one side and an opinion on the other.

Collect these paper slips, mix them into a bowl or box, and pull out one slip at a time. Read each side of each paper slip, and have the class determine which statement is the fact and which statement is the opinion.

Remind students that factual information is needed to support an editorial's topic sentence. An editorial supported only by opinions would not be highly persuasive to a reader, as it lacks authority. Distribute newspaper and magazine editorials you've collected beforehand.

Have students locate examples of facts and opinions, highlighting each with alternate colors. Discuss your findings together. Supportive Reasoning Step 1: Brainstorm a list of editorial topics, and have students select a topic of their choice.

On separate sheets of paper, ask them to list facts that support their opinion about their topic of choice. Then have them number their facts in the order of importance that would be most convincing to an audience.

How to Write an Editorial | Pen and the Pad

Take a trip to the school media center or computer lab. Have your students research their selected topics further. With access to the Internet, encyclopedias, books, magazines, newspapers, and other sources, students can confirm, expound, and clarify their reasons to further support the topics they've selected.

Once they've finished and collected their research, have students organize and write their editorials. Here is an organizer for their use: Reason 1 and support Be sure to use facts and not just opinions. Reason 2 and support Be sure to use facts and not just opinions.

Reason 3 and support Be sure to use facts and not just opinions. How will you close and wrap up this editorial? Have students then evaluate each other's editorials.

Was the editorial written persuasively? With these three lessons, your students now have a solid understanding of how to write an editorial.Lesson 2: How to Write an Editorial: Facts and Opinions Step 1: With your students, review the differences between facts and opinions.

Remind them that an opinion is a belief held by a person, whereas a fact is a specific statement which can be proven true. STEP 2: Now, using your research and notes, write an outline for your own article. Remember, your first version of a story is a first draft, not a finished article.

Here a few good tips for turning in a quality story to your editor/teacher. Read the story at least one time for comprehension. 10 Rules for Writing Opinion Pieces By: Susan Shapiro | July 27, Opinionated editorial essays are often the most fun, fast and furious pieces to get into print—especially for nonfamous writers with strong opinions and day jobs in other fields.

Likewise, writing news stories is uniquely different from writing editorials.

how to write an editorial article for kids

Editorials can be written from three points of view: an editorial staff, a small team or pair, or one person (often readers of the publication). All editorials share commonality and can be taught to kids with some practice.

Nov 12,  · Edit Article How to Write a Notable Editorial. Three Methods: The Basics Writing Your Editorial Sample Editorial Community Q&A An editorial is an article that presents a group's opinion on an issue and because of this, it is usually unsigned%().

Spend more time writing: To teach kids to write well, you need to ask them to write a lot. You’re not going to become a great basketball player unless you play a lot of basketball.

Writing a Newspaper Article | Scholastic